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Washington This Week

News/Business. The week's events from Capitol Hill, the White House and around the country. (Stereo)

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Jack Kemp 33, Us 32, Fbi 25, America 14, Washington 12, New York 7, Florida 7, Tom Foley 7, United States 6, Bush 6, Nsa 5, Ronald Reagan 5, Jack 5, Russia 5, Cia 4, D.c. 4, Manchester 4, New Hampshire 3, Ike Skelton 3, Kgb 3,
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  CSPAN    Washington This Week    News/Business. The week's events from Capitol  
   Hill, the White House and around the country. (Stereo)  

    November 3, 2013
    1:00 - 2:01am EST  

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more families breathed easier because they know their country will be there for them in times of need. all of them, all of us, are indebted to the towering man. i think, in listening to the wonderful memories that have been shared, we get a sense of this man. we recognize his humility. he often attributed much of his sets to good luck. he may have had a point. leader mcconnell told the story about his first race. there were a couple of details that got left out. on the way to olympia to file the paperwork for his first congressional campaign, apparently tom blew out a tire.
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so he and friends hitchhiked to a service station to get it fixed. as they approached the outskirts of the city, they ran out of gas. so they pushed the car up the hill, coasting into town just before the deadline. tom went on to win the race by a resounding 54 votes. there is no question there may have been some luck of the irish operating when it came to tom foley, as well as incredible stamina. what led him to make history as the first speaker of the house from west of the rockies was not luck. it was his hard work. his deep integrity. and is powerful intellect. as michael so eloquently and movingly stated, his ability to find common ground with his colleagues across the aisle.
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it was his personal decency that helped him bring stability and order to a congress that demanded most -- both, and still does. it brings me to a final point. at a time when our political system can seem more polarized and more divided than ever before, it can be tempting to see the possibility of bipartisan progress as a thing of the past. old school, as bob said. it can be tempting to wonder if we still have room for leaders like tom, the environment, the media, the way districts are drawn, the pressures that those of us in elected office are under somehow preclude the possibility of that brand of leadership. well, i believe we have to find our way back there.
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now, more than ever. america needs public servants who are willing to place from solving ahead of politics. as the letter that president clinton held up indicates, the history of the crime bill shows. we are sent here to do what is right. sometimes, doing what is right is hard. it is not free. and yet, that is the measure of leadership. it is important for us who feel that responsibility to fight for a cause to recognize our cause is not advanced if we cannot also try to achieve compromise. the same way our founders sought it. as a vital part of our democracy.
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the very thing that makes our system of self-government possible. that is what tom foley believed. that is what he embodied. that is the legacy that shines rightly today. on the last day he presided as speaker, he described what it should feel like to serve the american people in this city. he spoke about coming to work in the morning and catching a glimpse of the capital. he said it ought to give anyone a thrill, a sense not only of personal satisfaction, but very deep gratitude to our constituents, for the honor of leading us represent them. tom never lost that sense of wonder. as i read that passage, what he
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wrote, the first time i visited capitol hill, tom was speaker. i was a very young man. i was doing community work. i remember seeing the capital and having the same sense of wonder. i think now about tom foley being here, doing that work, and inspiring what ultimately might have led me to be interested in public service, as well. when we are standing outside these magnificent buildings, we have the sense of wonder and hope. sometimes, the longer you are here, the harder it is to hang onto that. yet, tom foley never lost it.
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he never lost the sense of wonder and the sense of gratitude. what a privilege. that he felt it was to serve. he never forgot why he came here. on behalf of this nation and the state and the citizens that he loved and respected so much. as a country, we have to be grateful to him. to heather and the people of great state of washington, thank you so much for sharing tom with us. god west tom foley -- god bless tom foley. god bless america. [applause]
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>> mr. president, and to all of our speakers, thank you for your testimonials. i would like to ask leader below seek to join me as we presented mrs. foley with a flag flown over the capitol on the day of the speaker'staffing, and a copy of house resolution 383, expressing the house's sincerest condolences. >> thank you, president obama, [no audio]
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>> thank you, president obama, and president clinton. i so appreciate your coming to honor and celebrate tom's his life. thank you, norman dicks, and jim mcdermott. let me acknowledge congressman lewis and former congressman and republican leader bob michael, who both have always been great friends to tom and me. of course, i think senator harry reid and senator mitch mcconnell.
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for traveling a long way from the senate to the house. [laughter] to remember my husband. also, i want to thank the celestial on joy from japan. anderson, plus, the diplomatic delegations, for coming. ioa special debt of gratitude to speaker banner for making this memorial service possible. without his caring and competent staff, this event would not have happened. when my husband was speaker, we had about one person who handled this kind of work. the speaker has been most
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gracious and helpful and i applaud him for that. i want to say a few words about my husband. as you probably know, i work for him for years as an unpaid staffer. i did not plan to do in this when i married him in 1968. i was sort of wooed in. and i remained for the full-time he was here. i should say i stayed here unpaid and it was a great adventure. every time i thought of leaving, he would suddenly assume a new position. it was a great good fortune of my life to be along for the ride
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and see what happened next. early on, i discovered my husband was a wonderful teacher. david has written the nicest note about this. i think he was right on mark. i can look back and say that his father taught him about fairness, patients, and all the virtues everyone has mentioned today. there was a story that tom's father, who was a superior court judge, could sentence you to death and you would thank him. but when i think back, and what i thought at the time, is i am not sure where his judge got -- good judgment came from, how he understood the limits of power, and there are enormous limits to
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power, that we must work together and how much courage he often displayed when defending what he believed was right. some of it must have been the result of his jesuit education and his experience as a debater. a friend of his is here who knew him and debated with him and told me that at 16, he was just a wonderful, great man, even though he was just a young man at that time. i never knew, really, exactly why he always knew the right thing to say and do. perhaps it was his honesty and his resolve to keep his word. i do not know. i think back on our almost 45 years together and i think of
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the long meanings -- meetings that perhaps best displayed his ability to reason with people. 'ability to reason with people. one of them was in the old -- in the late 1960's. he had accepted the challenge of a man whose name i think was virgil. who was opposed to any form of gun control. he claimed thanh was -- tom was for every form of gun control. , agreed to appear at this forum at this local high school. virgil as in the newspapers, "i was able to attract -- i think he also wrote on radio and television -- an audience of about 700 people, tom stood on the stage 45.5 hours and answered all of the allegations
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with the reasons i never would have thought of. there were from the triple -- bumper stickers waived about the hungarians i can remember him saying he was not for repealing laws that limited a citizens use of canons and rockets, that he did not think you were entitled to have a missing silo right there in the backyard of your house. at first, the audience was hostile. at the end, a fatal mistake was made. he asked everyone to stand up and then he pleaded for money to
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pay for the ads. [laughter] people who were already standing, they just walked out. i have spent a good deal of my life overseas at this time. i was mesmerized to watch this. it was not like dealing with the pakistanis, or going to school there, were living in greece or egypt as i had done. it was something very different. i learned over the years, and i was able to see tom, reasons with all kinds of people and with all kinds of interesting arguments. you could always see another side to something.
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i got to see him in action with presidents and politicians on both sides of the house and both sides of the capitol. he was somehow able to walk others through their demands and show them where they were asking too much and where they might be right. he was not afraid to take a position that a constituent or colleague might oppose and explain why. i can remember the power administrator who came to get more goodies, to be told it was time the pacific northwest perhaps limited its demands and look in other directions to get more power. i am sure -- anyway.
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at the time, they agreed. he was a man of principle not afraid to compromise. he believed there was honor in compromising. when he nearly lost the election in 1980, he did not retreat to the life he enjoyed as chairman of the house of agriculture committee. as many would have done. instead, he became democratic with and started his climb up the leadership, the latter. and was appalled. i have gotten used to his position as chairman, and i was on good terms with the staff. suddenly, all of these people were going to lose their jobs.
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we could not take all of them with us to the with office. the budget was not that large. so, i got used to it. then he moved up the ladder again and again. it would have been the easy thing to stay as chairman of the agriculture committee. i should have known this extraordinary man was destined for extraordinary things. i am afraid i have kept you too long. thank you so much for coming to salute the life of a great man. thank you. [applause]
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>> dear lord, as we close our time together, send your spirit of tees and consolation upon us, who mourn the loss of the honorable former speaker of the house, tom fully. he was a glowing example of an icon of what it means to be a man for others. his decades of service to his home state of washington and to our great nation, will be long appreciated by those whose lives are forever blessed by his life classes work and dedication. may your injures come -- angels come to greet our beloved tom and those who mourn him here be consoled with the knowledge that for those who love you,
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everything is turned to good. amen. >> ladies and gentlemen, please be seated until the official party and family have departed. ♪
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he served missouri's fourth district more than 30 years. he was chairman of the armed services committee his last two years in office. he was 81 years old.
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>> my interest was influenced by and was involved in politics. i also received encouragement from others, including a significant boost from harry truman. 1962, i was working as -- i served as assistant eagletongeneral to tom . it happened to be the last day of filing for public office. my wife susan and i were in the attorney general's office. the president was on the phone
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to talk to me. that was a moment to remember. i declined once more. i later wrote to thank him for his telephone call. explaining why he had urged me to run. , i was honored to receive the support. that seems like yesterday. it is difficult for me to i'm serving my 15th term and privilege. >> members came to honor his life in public office. the tribute was led by emanuel cleaver.
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we will show the tribute, followed by house minority whip steny holler. >> mr. speaker, two days ago what one newspaper called perhaps one of the gentlemen of diedess, ike skelton, herein washington. for those of us here in the missouri delegation, as well as those who are involved in congressman skelton on armed services committee, we are here body that ourhe died.gue
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we are saddened by his unexpected data. ike skelton was 81 years old. he served 34 years. on theed all that time armed services committee, becoming the chair of armed services. he was a man of great humility. and man of great distinction. he was to be honored in two weeks at the truman library in kansas city. we think that he has been such a significant player in washington that we indeed had to stand up pain over hisr passing.
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we are asking at this time if we could have members please stand for a minute of silent reflection. -- unanimous for consent for members to stand in silence in memory of isaac newton skelton. [no audio] >> thank you, mr. chairman. speaker, we have just observed a moment of silence for isaac skelton, my friend emanuel friend, ike's good
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others to hear from the delegation, i want arise with tribute. moment of we will have an opportunity to speak a longer time. many of us had the opportunity to participate in a memorial service for tom foley. he was the speaker of this house. the gentleman spoke, one of the most revered members that has served in his body, robert michael. by was tom foley's friend. he was the leader of the republican side of the aisle. colleagues,iends, and cooperate with one another to the benefit of this institution and its members. adsdean of the house correctly that benefit of our
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country and all of its citizens. themichael observed stability that each one of them displayed, and the willingness to reach out across the our -- across the aisle and make things happen positively for our citizens. individualther within the last week's. bill young. similar personality. he added luster to this congress. major owens was another whom we lost. four people who made this institution a better place. ike skelton was my brother. he and i were sigma chi.
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his son was a sigma chi. his father was a sigma chi. we had a very special bond to start out with. in addition, his first wife susan, who died too early, as mine did, came out and knocked on doors for me in maryland just on the road here. i have a special bond with ike, also an extraordinary and great respect by the way he conducted himself as a representative of the people of his district in missouri. the respect that he gave to each of us and the respect that he received in return. how sad it is that these giants, tom foley, bill young, ike skelton, and major owens, passed from this body, passed from this life, but how joyful it is at
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the extraordinary contributions each of them made to this house which we should revere and love the people's house. ike skelton was of the people, for the people, and certainly by the people. i yield back the balance of my time. i will be glad to yield for my friend. >> i want to thank the gentleman for speaking. ike lived in northern virginia when i was here, and i would see him many times on the weekend. when i saw that he had died, i felt very badly. think of what the gentleman said many nights as i was driving home, i would see the car -- ike skelton and bill everson. they carpooled together, bill everson our public and member, bite from your side, they carpooled together. they were the best of friends. ike was one of the finest people i served with.
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i yield back. >> i think the gentleman for his comment. i yield back the balance of my time. >> this week, health and human services secretary kathleen cifelli us was in front of the house energy and commerce committee. in her testimony, she talked about some of the websites reported problems and how they are being fixed. she also addressed the issue of individuals receiving cancellation notices from their insurance providers. the hearing you can see in its entirety tomorrow at 10:35 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> john foster dulles had recently died when that super airport out in chantilly, virginia was being built. president eisenhower immediately announced at the airport would be named dulles airport. for a while when kennedy took over, he didn't want to name it
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after a crusty old cold warrior, but there was pushed back from others. finally, the decision was made to name it after dulles. you can still see the film clip of kennedy opening the airport with eisenhower there, allen dulles air, and he pulls back a curtain, and behind the curtain is this giant bust of john foster dulles. that bust stands in the middle of this big airport. i went to see it while i was writing this book. i couldn't find it. i started asking the security guards, where's the big bust of dulles? nobody had ever even heard of it. it was a long process. finally, thanks to the washington airport authority, i was able to discover that the bus had been taken away from its place in the middle of the airport, and it is now in a closed conference room opposite baggage claim number three. i find this a wonderful metaphor fo rhow the dulles brothers -- for how the dulles brothers, who at one time had exercised earth shattering power and were able
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to make and break governments, have now been effectively forgotten and airbrushed out of our entire history. >> with john foster heading state and alan at eia, the dulles brothers led both overt and covert operations for a good portion of the cold war. find out what the ramifications can still be felt some 60 years later stephen kinzer, sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> next former florida governor jeb bush receiving this year's jack kemp foundation leadership award at an event in washington, d c --washington, d.c. -- washington, d.c. other guests included congressman paul ryan and senator marco rubio. it is an hour. >> you all are much more orderly
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than my four boys at home. thank you all for being here this evening. welcome to the 2013 kemp leadership award dinner. i would like to introduce and have you welcome the speaker of the united states house of representatives, john boehner. [applause] >> hi, everybody. all right. thanks for that great introduction you just gave me. [laughter] i'm just here to say, welcome, and a lot of you know that i come from a big family.
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if i had food in front of me, i ate it. i will cite you what elizabeth taylor told her fifth husband -- honey, i won't keep you long. [laughter] i'm proud to be here tonight to honor the memory of our friend jack kemp, and i'm also especially honored to be here tonight to welcome your honorary, jeb bush. somebody who is my friend, somebody who i think he minimizes all the things that checkup -- epitomizes all the things that jack kemp laid out as his vision. on top of that, he is a pretty good golf partner. 40 years ago, i was just married. i was about to take over a small business. i thought i was a democrat.
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i grew up in a household of fdr, kennedy democrats, never really thought much about it, wasn't politically active, but during the 1970s, i had this epiphany. this epiphany was brought about by two people -- ronald reagan and jack kemp. when you think about it, ronald reagan would talk about the shining city on a hill. reagan would exude all of this optimism. then i got to know were got to read about jack kemp in the 1970s. he was talking about an opportunity society, talking about low tax rates, trying to help everyone be their best in america. coming from where i came from, it all kind of resonated little bit. i've got 11 brothers and sisters. my dad owned a bar.
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i got brothers and sisters on every rung of the economic ladder. the idea of an opportunity society was kind of who i was. over the course of the 1970s and 1980s, these two people, especially during the 1970s -- by the end of the 1970s, i was a republican -- i had a reagan bumper sticker on in 1980 during the primary. sorry, jeb. in 1988, i found myself a manchester -- in a manchester, new hampshire, if you will recall. in february of 1988, a lowly state rep, business guy goes to manchester, new hampshire to my buddy jack kemp. i was at this dinner with jack and joanne. there were a bunch of these big- time congressmen. the next day, i got my assignment to knock on doors.
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i was assigned to go to the city dump. i thought, what the hell is this? i went to the dump because in manchester, new hampshire, they don't pick up garbage. you have to take it to the dump. i stood at the dump on a cold day in february of 1988, shaking hands with all the people coming to bring the garbage, asking them to vote for jack cap -- kemp in a republican primary. [laughter] the thing about jack kemp, jihad vision. jack kemp brought a vision to our party and brought me a vision that has been with me ever since. that vision was the opportunity society -- welfare reform, lower tax rates, trying to help every american be the best they can be/ -- can be. to this day, i can't tell you the two political titles that i've had in my lifetime, ronald reagan and jack kemp. when you think about what we are dealing with today and the so- called vision of this administration of bigger government, higher taxes, the benevolence of government, as
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opposed to the individual and trying to help every individual in america be all they can be, the contrast couldn't be better. i am here tonight to say, thank you. thank all of you for continuing to keep the vision of jack kemp alive and well. thank you for honoring my friend in his epitome, jeb bush, tonight. god bless you all. [applause] [laughter] >> mr. speaker, you know you need no introduction. i really appreciate you being here and sharing your words. we appreciate your vision. yes, mom. [laughter] it never changes.
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your grace under pressure, mr. speaker, and your dedication to the good of our nation and the animus behind the kemp foundation, which is the american idea, is embodied in you and your work. what you just said a few moments ago before you came up on stage was, we need to take the long view. in this country, we have an incredible history. there is an incredible legacy that has been passed to us. i truly appreciate your grace under pressure. you are a great leader for this nation. we appreciate you being here. when we started this foundation four years ago in 2009, it was because of the promise i made to my father that i would take care of his papers. he had 400 boxes of papers that needed to be taken care of. my mom had a great idea. she said, jimmy, why don't you call dr. billings at the library of congress?
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the doctor said, jimmy, can i answer question you did not ask? i said, i wish people would answer questions i asked every day of my life. he said, the library of congress wants your dad's papers. that was the beginning of the foundation and part of my recognition, after working with my dad for eight years, that the ideas that he believed in and that he communicated so well needed a place to grow into the future. that's what the foundation is about. growth and opportunity in the future. you are going to hear a lot about it tonight. we are so pleased that you are here to share that with us. one of the key messages in which we all believe is the message of inclusion, that every child, every person is a child of god
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with innate value and intrinsic opportunity. my dad loved george gilder. torch gilder has just written a book called "knowledge and power." knowledge is about capitalism. the capital of capitalism is knowledge. just think, all the resources in our earth where there when the neanderthals were walking the earth, but what has increased his knowledge. you and i are here because we believe that there is truth, that truth matters, and that this country, more than any other country in history, has been able to unleash that human potential. that is what we believe is the american idea. we are so grateful that there are leaders like speaker boehner, chairman ryan comments and some many others who believe passionately and deeply in the
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american idea, which is the human idea. that is why we are here. we believe in inclusion, that it is for everyone, not for any special class of people. it is the unique idea that is captured in our founding documents. aren't we blessed to live in this incredible country where people can become whatever they want as long as they are willing to work? that's the country we all want to have. i appreciate you coming here to share in that idea, that belief, that hope, and those actions that we need to take to keep it so. it is always under attack and endanger -- in danger. i think you will agree that we have a wonderful nominee and a warty for the camp leadership award. 'governor bush, we appreciate you being here with us. the kemp family so grateful to you and to the bush family. it's interesting. back when my father served in
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congress, i grew up in bethesda, maryland. many people ask me, where did you grow up? it was in buffalo, new york. why? the job is in washington, d.c. there is something that my mom understands better than any of us. the power of the personal. if you have ever met joe when kemp, you know she cares about each and every person she meets. in congress in the 1970s and 1980s, it wasn't a perfect time there is no idyllic time -- but one of the curators six -- the characteristics that i remember are congressmen and senators coming to my mom and dad's house to talk about the ideas on a and to talk about the ideas on a weekend. can you imagine that? representatives and senators were in d.c. on weekends. i understand that times change, but that had a huge impact on the power of the personal being able to cross some of the
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ideological and policy divides. we believe that good policy ultimately makes good politics. [applause] it is why you can take the long view and continue to believe in the principles that have made this country great. we really appreciate each of you being here. i do want to recognize some of the current and former senators and members of the house of representatives who are here. if you don't mind, save for the ones who will be coming up on stage. i would like you to stand and be recognized. political service is an honorable and incredibly important service to the country. our military heroes and soldiers, they are critical -- we all value them deeply. our political service is also incredible. it is not an easy job.
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they deserve to be held in high regard. tonight, i would like you to greet after you read the full -- we have congressman marshall auburn -- marsha blackburn, senator bill brock, congressman steve gaines, congressman richard hanna, speaker bob livingston, congressman bob mcewen, congressman michael turner. if you would please stand and be acknowledged, and a fine miss anybody, stand up. -- if i miss anybody, stand up. [applause] this is a highlight for the kemp family. we have many kemp family members here. my mom and dad have 17 grandchildren. i'm not going to name them all. if you are a member of the family, please rise and be acknowledged. i'm sorry to embarrass you, but my boys are in the back corner. [applause]
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and kemp family members, rise. kemp family members, rise. now i would like everybody else to stand as d.c. washington comes to lead us in the national anthem. >> ♪ oh say can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ ♪what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight last gleaming ♪ ♪ whose rod stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ through the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ ♪ were so gallantly streaming ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air
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♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh say does that star-spangled ♪ ♪ banner yet wave ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ ♪ and the home of the brave [applause] >> not only did he belted out, but he knew every word, which was nice. [laughter] thank you, that was wonderful. i'm jennifer andrews grid i would like us all to bow in prayer. heavenly father, we honor you as
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god our creator and redeemer. you are mighty, gracious, and adjust. we humble ourselves here before you knowing that all of us fall short of your glory. we you. we are so thankful for jeb bush and his family, for then serving in our country. thank you for the whole wonderful bush family. they have been a blessing to us. we ask now that you give us perseverance, give us winsome -- wisdom, give us your guidance. in each of our own ways, we are leaders, whether it is on the soccer field or football field, whether it is in an orchestra or community or in public service.
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bless this food to our nourishment. we honor you, god. in jesus's name will, we pray, name, we pray, amen. >> you may now start your salad, but while you are eating your salad -- when we launched the foundation, our first project was the kemp legacy project. we were honored to have as part of that a kemp chair for political economy at the library of congress. mort is going to come introduce a video that we would like you to watch as you eat your salad. we appreciate mort dedicating so much time and effort to the kemp foundation and the legacy project.
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ladies and gentlemen, morten contracted -- kondracki. >> i am here to invite you to watch this video on the kemp legacy project. it consisted of an oral history project that included more than 100 interviews with people who played with jack, played football with jack, and worked with him in congress at hud and other venues. two years of research i did at the library of congress, which will culminate in a clinical biography that fred barnes and i are writing, in which we have every reason to think, based on visits with publishers, will result in the book that will be published sometime in 2015.
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we hope that this will not simply be a biography but will the and encourage and to the american political system of both parties, but a specially the republican party, to readopt the kemp spirit, which was always positive, optimistic, growth-oriented, passionate, and compassionate, inclusive, idea- driven, big tent. jack spoke at the 1976 republican national convention and said that the republican party had to be about more than merely opposing what the democrats were imposing on the country. republican party had to develop its own distinct ideas for making life better for ordinary americans. it is a message that applies again today. in health policy, and urban policy, job creation, in energy and environment policy,
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infrastructure, education, figuring out how to cause the median income of the average american to rise again, which it has not been doing, to reinstitute growth in the economy. he didn't say this, but others have said this, that the republican party needs an organization like the one that moderate democrats created after the debacles of mcgovern liberalism, the democratic leadership council. such an organization would develop policies, make a conservative philosophy relevant to ordinary people around the country and convince them that republicans have ways to make their lives better and make the republican party the opportunity
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party again that jack kemp always wanted it to be and also party of lincoln. there are lots of republicans around. some of them in d.c., some of them out in the states. what they need is a gathering place and a trumpet and a rallying center. the kemp foundation has the potential to be that organization. i hope you will find ways to make it so with your time, with your ideas, and yes, with your money. now, the video -- enjoy your salads. if you could hold on your conversation until after the video is over, we would appreciate it. fix very much. -- thanks very much. [applause] >> no government has been able to do for people what people
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have been able to do for themselves when they have that opportunity. the american society as a whole can never achieve the outer reaches of its potential so long as it tolerates the inner cities of despair. the american dream is not to make everyone level with everyone else. but two great opportunity for all people, to reach as high as their god-given potential allows. >> jack was a star from the day he walked into the house. >> i've always thought that it does go back to jack working as a football player and quarterback who had to inspire his teammates. there was a sense of inspiring us. >> there are no limits to our future so long as we don't limit our people. >> i'm morten contracted. i'm honored to serve as the first jack kemp scholar at the library of congress. i've also spent a good part of the last two years working with brian williams developing the cap world history project. in all, we have explored jack kemp's career.
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what we have seen is the portrait of an american idealist, a leader with a passion for the competition of ideas and an absolute commitment to the power of the american spirit. we have also learned a few things about the qualities of leadership in triumph and advice and adversity. >> he used to love to play tennis. he's 52 years old. i should be able to beat him at 25 years old. we are playing tennis. he is just selecting his tail off. i don't know if i'm supposed to try to beat him or beaten. [laughter] am i going to get on the plane with him or not? i hit a drop shot. he goes flying across the court takes a dive, skins his four head and shoulder, and makes the shot in windsor point. i turn around thinking, what the hell is going on here? jack had two careers. in both of them, he was a competitor. he had to convince you what he had to -- what he had come to
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believe she knew was right. he had to convince everybody. 55 minutes in, he still hadn't convinced the guy in the third row. >> he would not leave the rope line. i would try to pull them all the time and say, we've got to go. we would be in danger of not being able to hold our ground. he loved people. he would say, they went to all the effort to come out and see me, and they want to shake my hand -- i should shake their hands. >> jack's public career began in professional football, and carried him to the u.s. house of representatives, presidential primaries, and eventually to the republican ticket in 1996. as we spoke with the men and women who surrounded him during those years, we saw common themes develop. among them, jack's steadfast commitment to the ideas he
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believed in. >> he did not like the 1986 tax reform package. he thought it was a tax increase. i kind of agree with him and made it known that i wasn't going to support it. i wound up in the oval office with president reagan's same, if i can't count on the web, who can i count on? i was thinking, jack kemp got me in it. [laughter] >> the fact is what kemp brought was not only important for republicans. more importantly, he persuaded ronald reagan. that's what makes him such an historic figure in my view. as a result of supply-side economics, we restored our economy. we had a booming economy. gorbachev felt he couldn't compete with us economically. that was obviously what temp brought.
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he thought he couldn't compete with us militarily because they were in such dire straits economically. i believe it was reaganomics that was key to that victory. jack kemp was instrumental in both our economic recovery and also winning the cold war. >> you talk about jack kemp, and one word comes to mind -- the cause. wherever he is, he will fight for that cause. he will work for that cause. >> it was easy to believe in the "cause" that he fought for because almost always it was the right thing to do. he really did approach life in that way. even when he didn't have the political support to do it, is a special interest group said, we can't fight this fight, he would say, i will keep going. he did that time and time again.
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>> history's most effective leaders including jack's heroes abraham lincoln and winston churchill offered a vision of a better future. four jack, that meant challenging what was wrong with the other side's ideas and extolling what was right and uplifting about his own. >> the purpose of a truly great party is to provide a superior ideas, principled leadership, and a compelling cause. >> jack did not want to win negatively. he was allergic to doing that. he wanted to win positively. you would try to goad him to attack. it just wasn't him. >> there are always people afterwards looking for statements -- scapegoats. i had people calling me saying, what a terrible job i did in the debate, he didn't offend me enough.
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it wasn't a personal reason. that was his style. >> this is something i cannot get my head around. here he is, professional quarterback, football player, in the most violent sport in america, and he's a competitor. he likes to win. yet when it comes to hitting somebody, he won't hit. how do you explain that? >> he was a quarterback. [laughter] they don't hit anybody. >> in fact, there were many leadership lessons that jack learned in the nfl that set him apart as a political leader. jack was a happy warrior who inspired people to follow him. he was still a person who brought people into politics. there are people who are republicans because jack kemp was a politician.
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>> in 1961, we were going to dallas to play with the chargers. we weren't allowed in the hilton in dallas. the owner of the team owned the hotel. they said, ok, the white guys can stay at the hilton, but the black guys have to go to grand prairie. jack kemp said, this is not acceptable. either we stay as a team, or we don't play. jack kemp was the guy that actually did it. we all ended up in the crappy as hotel -- crappiest hotel becaue of -- because of kemp. >> the project is about more than looking over one man's inspiring career. it is about showing how pragmatic leadership principles can continue to be part of the american experiment. >> over the years, we did a lot of events together on tax reform. it kind of gave a very nice picture to have these two guys up there, won a football player,
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one a basketball player, one a democrat, one the republican, and they were both concerned about the same thing. if there were any disagreements, which they're rarely were, they were openly expressed, but they were both headed in the right traction. people look at this and say, that's the way it should be. >> kemp republicans exist. we can't be a 51% majority nation. the republican party has to be able to have a message for african-americans and hispanics and union members and inner-city folks. maybe we don't get it all right. maybe not every policy is perfect. if we are not constantly striving to have a message to communicate to everybody, we've failed. >> he wasn't constantly rerunning last week's gain. that just wasn't him.
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and public policy, he was all forward-looking. it was always about the next victory. it was never about last month's defeat. never. >> last year he said to me, elections are about tomorrow, not yesterday. >> we are going to ask for the support of every single american. our appeal of boundless opportunity crosses every barrier of geography, race, and belief in america. we are not going to leave anybody out of this opportunity society. we may not get every vote, but we will speak to every heart. with word and action, we will represent the entire american family. that's what we must be all about. [applause] ♪ [applause]
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>> thank you for watching that with us. i know it brings a lot of wonderful memories to many of you who worked with him. mr. speaker, we know that you have places to be. you are good. thank you. [applause] i didn't know that i would have to excuse the speaker of the house. [laughter] this evening, before we get to the main course, we have a wonderful main course to introduce our awardee. i want to introduce you to a good friend of mine and the kemp family's. he is the group vice president of the ford motor company, a
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great american company, and i will tell you that my dad insisted that he drive an american-made ford thunderbird throughout his congressional career. it is an honor for us to have ford motor company as a major sponsor of the kemp leadership award dinner. it is an honor to introduce you to the group vice president of the ford motor company. [applause] >> thanks, jimmy. i'm with ford, but more importantly, i'm a former kemp intern. [laughter] [applause] let me tell you -- life's a lot better outside that mailroom. [laughter] i want to start by thanking the
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kemp foundation for their work in advancing the american idea of growth, freedom, democracy, and hope. ford is proud to sponsor this great program. at ford, we have worked hard to embrace the principles of the american idea since our founding, from the moving assembly line that henry ford pioneered 100 years ago this month to our more recent decisions to forgo emergency taxpayer assistance from the government. [applause] that's why tonight is such a privilege to introduce governor jeb bush as we honor him with the kemp leadership award. governor bush is uniquely suited for this recognition. his independent thinking, compassionate approaches to policy, and solution-oriented leadership values held dear and exemplified by the late jack kemp. throughout his life, jeb bush has proved an exceptional leader in advancing the american idea as everyone knows, jeb bush was twice elected as the
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governor of florida. during his tenure, he focused on real ways to improve peoples lives. it began with improving the state's economy. governor bush delivered on his principles, cutting $20 billion in taxes, building florida's global reputation for trade and investment, and reducing the state government workforce by more than 13,000. his limited government approach helped unleash economic growth in the state, creating 1.4 million new jobs. most dear to his heart is improving education. especially those children to which opportunity has been denied. as governor, jeb bush transformed florida's educational system, which is why he is a go to mentor for educational leaders across the nation. as one of the most respected voices in the arena, governor bush has brought continued passion and focus to this issue through the foundation for excellence in education that he launched in two thousand eight. most recently, governor bush has been an advocate for more -- for
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a more inclusive tone in the republican party. his book makes the case that immigration reform is vital to america's future, and also, it's the right thing to do. for governor bush, immigration isn't just a policy issue. it is part of his family's heritage, his wife of nearly 40 years, colombo, was born in mexico, and they are the proud parents of three children. his family is the new american family. the thing that really sets jeb bush apart is that he is a conservative that stands for something, not just against it. as jack kemp once said, our appeal of boundless opportunity crosses every barrier of geography, race, and belief. we may not get every vote, but we will speak to every heart. in word and action, we will represent our entire american family. each day, governor bush does just that. he looks ahead to what can be
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done to improve people's lives and preserve freedom, how we as a nation can grow our economy and strengthen our democracy, and how we can do it all by working together. that is a noble mission. it is one so deserving of recognition at any time, especially right now. thank you, governor, for being a positive force for good and a beacon of hope. we need more of you. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. thanks, speaker banner. he's gone! [laughter] i appreciate the speaker coming. he is a busy guy. to all the elected officials that are serving, we appreciate your service. i know it is not an easy thing to do. i'm so grateful for the kemp
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family. we have been close friends for many years. joann, you're beautiful as always. [applause] it is great to see mostly old friends and some new ones. it is a joy to be here. and truly honored to accept this award. as i thought about preparing my remarks, i kind of had memories of jack kemp and his importance in our society and his influence on me. the work of the kemp foundation is very important. i am very thankful and grateful for what jack kemp has done for our country, but as i said, for the opportunity to know him, it has been very special. i miss him a lot. these days, i wonder, what would jack kemp to? as i watched the cable news shows, i wonder what he would think about the downward course our nation has taken under president obama in the last few years and the partisan gridlock that is paralyzing washington right now. i would love to hear his
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prescriptions on the big issues we face, how to jumpstart economic growth when the majority party in two thirds of government is fixated not on growth, but on distribution of people's hard-earned money. i'm also locked into a pretty competitive family fantasy football league. i think getting some tips from jack would be quite helpful right now as well. [laughter] thankfully, jack has left an enduring legacy as a champion of policies that create growth and opportunity, and we can continue to draw lessons from his leadership or years to come. when i was running for governor in 1994, jack kemp was the first national figure -- maybe my dad was the first national figure -- perhaps jack was the second national figure to come down to campaign for this rookie candidate. he was smart. he was charismatic. he was a tireless campaigner. he was a really fun guy to be around. in preparation for these remarks, i went back and looked at some old photos. i saw a picture of jack, myself, and margie kincaid in 1994.
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for some of you that know anything about florida politics, margie kincaid and her husband bill were pioneers in the local republican political scene dating back to the 1950s. we never knew how old margie was, but she was the chairman of the republican party in hillsborough county, tampa, for what appeared to be at least 50 years. she ran the place like the soviets probably run their political party. [laughter] i don't know. she was really tough. when that good looking and brilliant jack kemp showed up to endorse me, she was on cloud nine. like a teenager at her first bieber concert. [laughter] jack's appeal went far beyond the republican grassroots where he had strong admiration and strong support. what was most striking to me was campaigning with jack kemp and places republicans don't normally hang out, which by the way i recommend to republican candidates. try it. you'll actually like it.
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it is kind of fun to actually get outside your comfort zone. [applause] i will never forget going into a tampa housing project with jack kemp. he didn't like to talk little more than other politicians, but i never thought of it the way that morton brought it up -- he wanted to persuade every simple -- single person in that room, whether they liked it or not, that his cause is righteous. i will never forget going into this project, they have probably never seen a republican go to their place to speak. he ended up with a standing ovation. it had a lasting impact on me. the best way to campaign is first to listen, to learn, and then to persuade. if we have that is the process of campaigning, we are going to be a lot better going forward not only as a party but as a nation. jack's appeal was brought because he worked hard to be inclusive, to reach out to all people. he understood the power and the
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necessity of successful communication and was not afraid to passionately presses case for a conservative governing principle, regardless of the audience. he knew conservative policies could and should be attractive across all races, across all income brackets, across all cultures because it is a politics of aspiration and equality. we are a center-right country. conservatives won't govern again soon unless we adopt his example to get outside our comfort zones to listen, to learn, and to persuade. it is what he would do now if he was here. i think he would agree, we have strayed away from the politics of winning from the politics of opportunity, and from achieving the governing needed to compass -- accomplish big things. that is what we have been lacking. i think jack's influence will hopefully spread like a contagion all across the country
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so that we can regain our footing. jack kemp also lived the notion that a hopeful and inspirational message would always be more effective than a negative one. i, as a candidate, have tried to crush my opponent and said some negative things. i never saw jack kemp's a single negative and -- kemp say a single negative thing about an opponent. for a guy to be so successful in politics, never saying an unkind thing about somebody else, truly remarkable. [applause] right now, our nation finds itself struggling on how to realize policies that expand, not contract, opportunity for more americans. here are some deeply disturbing facts. in 2010, 33% of all american families either had no net worth or negative net worth. the average duration of unemployment in the united states is three times longer today than it was in 2000. the number of people on food
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stamps has grown from 17 million in 2000 to 48 million this year. the number of people receiving social security disability payments is 10 times more than it was in 1980, even though the number of disabled is actually in decline. the percentage of people who own homes today is lower than it was in 1980. the same can be said for worker participation rates. today, in america, the greatest country on the face of this earth, if you are born poor, you are more likely to stay poor. if you are born rich, you're more likely to stay wealthy than at any time in modern history in the united states. the anecdote is to restore the right to rise, the right to pursue economic opportunity and happiness. jack kemp discussed this change in terms of advancing universal values of the american idea, growth, freedom, democracy, and hope. i want to talk about a few policies that i think can do just that. first, our greatest vehicle for
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reigniting social and economic mobility is education. every child has the capacity to learn. that means that the classroom is where we can create opportunity or end it. education is the great equalizer in closing the income divide in america, but that means every child must have access to a great school and great teachers. today in america, that does not exist. failing schools result in the reverse. students who drop out of school without achieving a diploma are likelier to possess a lifetime dependency on government, likelier to be unable to provide for their families, and likelier to end up in our correctional system. education reform is the civil rights issue of our time, but dramatically raising the equality of education is also essential for sustaining our competitive posture in the world and securing our long-term economic future. thankfully, there are proven
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reforms that are being implemented and growing pockets throughout our nation that we know work. the key to improving education is widespread embrace of higher expectations and higher standards, including the common core, more accountability, much more parental choice of every kind, ending social promotion, this insidious policy that passes kids along without them learning the basic things and thinking their self-esteem matters more than whether they can calculate math or read. improving education was my first priority as governor. it was where my passions were. i guess it is the reason why i have been invited here tonight. i thank you for allowing me to be part of the movement to make sure that every child learns in america and that we rebuild our country in a more optimistic way rather than trying to redistribute wealth. [applause]
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here is what i know to be true, that god has given every child the ability to learn. it is up to the adults, not just inside the system, but all adults to organize the system around them, rather than around the economic interests of the adults in the system who do quite well. if we did that, we would be far better off. [applause] next, while much of the debate over our nation's immigration policies have been dominated recently by explosive clinical rhetoric -- political rhetoric, the conversation has ignored the economic imperative of fixing a broken immigration system. we are rapidly moving towards an aging population, which means less productivity, fewer workers, lower growth, and an increasing burden on the next generation. i'm not sure that people under the age of 40 fully appreciate what is going to hit them, but once they do, they are going to be a little resentful.
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we are going to have significant challenges as a nation. it is better to solve the problem today, better to solve this problem, and we have, as a country, one unique way to do it that no other country can do -- frankly, jack kemp anticipated this paradigm. "the national review" reflected -- recollected nearly two decades ago the work that jack has done. two decades ago, he warned, republicans about fostering a nativist, anti-immigration climate. unlike most in the world, the united states truly have a tried-and-true way to solve this -- immigration. as the number of businesses started by nativeborn americans has declined, businesses started by immigrants have soared bice -- by 50%. we talk about immigration reform. let's start with this in mind. if someone wants to contribute
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to america's growth, let's have a system that lets that happen. let's remove the roadblocks and the bureaucratic nonsense, and let's restore as a key element of who we are as a nation our immigrant heritage based on the rule of law. i can guarantee you that we would grow significantly more. [applause] third, we must acknowledge our nations lack of a market-based strategy on energy. it is holding back our economy and our citizens. we are the most energy-abundant nation in the world. we have more than 100 years of supply of natural gas, billions of barrels of reserves of oil, and we are truly the source of inspiration and innovation for conservation, renewables, and for traditional extraction of energy. yet last year, the united states set out $300 billion with no economic impact to pay for imported oil. much of these billions go to countries other than mexico and
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canada that either hate us now or are politically unstable and could quickly learn to hate us in a heartbeat. the most transformative development since the internet was commercialized is a combination of two existing innovations -- horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracking. this domestic oil and gas revolution allows us to have a whole new host of opportunities to empower people to be successful and live lives of purpose and meaning in their way. we could industrialize the country with the lowest cost energy source in the world. we could reduce costs for consumers, as is happening. hundreds of billions of dollars each year now in terms of savings for lower power bills. we can create thousands of high wage jobs in the united states. we already know what the solutions are. many people in the room are working on this. i would encourage them to continue to do so. it is time we approve the keystone pipeline, for crying out loud.
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this makes no sense. [applause] think of the construction jobs. think of the union jobs that will be created, high wage jobs to allow us to integrate and north american energy strategy that makes us energy secure within five years. it is within our grasp. we should have rational not ridiculous regulation of fracking. we should open up federal lands and waters for drilling in a thoughtful way. we should let market forces decide where to invest and how to incentivize citizens to conserve. addal energy strategy could an additional one percent growth over the long haul. one percent of additional growth in a decade of time creates a half a germany in the 10th year and craves something like $500 billion of tax revenues at all low-level without raising taxes. it crates a burst of optimism
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and an opportunity that people will take as perhaps a build new coalitions to discard the old way of doing things to build new coalitions for america to solve our other problems. the fourth thing i would suggest to you is no amount of good policy will matter if we do not focus on a shared belief that strong families and faith are the a bomb of any american. unfortunately, -- [applause] we have a crisis on the family front. the latest census numbers reflect the fact. 42% out of wedlock birth rates. one of the breathtaking statistics that describe family life in america today. the family structure as we have known it for centuries is crumbling. instinctivelyeft called for another government program. a transfer payment.
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a rule or regulation. you know the government cannot do this. jack once said the people we become is determined not by the government but by the nature of our families and churches and synagogues and our schools and colleges will stop he remains right. there are fantastic faith based groups providing support. senator mike lee and others are proposing incredibly sound policy to restore -- invite incentives for child rearing families to give them the time -- and the type of support they need through our tax code. it does not require the growth of government, the cultural shift aware the role of family and faith and empowering individuals to concede. -- to succeed. transform education and immigration system for our heritage and energy policy days on north america resources and
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ingenuity and committed family life will restore prosperity for many more americans and what we have today. there's another important part of this which is economic freedom and all of its forms will sustain prosperity over the long haul. no one understood that better than jack kemp. he was the prime architect of policies thriving modern supply economics and tearing down the barriers into the capital system for those left behind. those policies led to exponential growth that we theyed in the 1980's under leadership of ronald reagan. more people benefited under that than what we have today. conservatives need to advance economic freedom through the tax code and lower tax rates. the of the loss productivity admits allocated from the most convoluted tax code in the world.
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to advance economic freedom through a monetary policy that does not punish savers. current policy rewards portfolio americans at the expense of paycheck america while enabling the greatest deficits in american history. conservative need to advance freedom by repelling obamacare and replacing it with a system that is consumer directed and significantly less costly. conservatives need to advance economic freedom by tearing down the barriers created by mindnumbing rules and atulations and licenses every level of government that stifles job creation and innovation and does not reward the spirit and determination necessary to be successful in life. if jack cap was here with us today, i am confident he would be advancing the american
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renewal by embracing freedom in every way. i want to end with a couple of notes about my mentor and hero. jack was a compassionate man. it is interesting we find ourselves at a party in a movement and as a nation confronting many of the same policy changes that jack cap -- predicted from immigration to education reform. i was honored when jack served as honorary chairman of the foundation for florida's future. i asked him and i thought he was say no. it was the greatest call i ever had in my life. it was a think tank we launched weflorida and his idea, stole every possible one that we could. by the way when i was fortunate the second time around to be governor, it was not just about ideas but putting them into practice to make sure more people had a chance to be
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successful and live the lives of purpose. i want to highlight what jack believed was that his family was his legacy. sweetheart.is nothing made him more content than spending time on the tennis courts, the ski slopes with his family including his children. and his grandchildren. i am not going to mention all 17. i want to mention kyle, jennifer, jackie, and benji who are all here tonight. [applause] read that jack kemp never miss one of their football games and i can contact as somebody who is had to live a life on the road. what an incredible commitment to family that is. knowing that his love of football and family i believe he did it. i know he did not miss a lot of a ballet recitals and not
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football related events. if anybody thinks it was a chauvinist family. the work being undertaken by the foundation to build upon his legacy and to advance his ideas today and in the future is really important. the fad you are here providing financial support warms my heart. heree fact you are providing financial support warms my heart. thank you for that. [applause]
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>> and you want me to do it? >> that was fantastic. >> congratulations. congratulations. as a token of our appreciation, would like you to have one of the jack's favorite books from his collections. 1857 edition of the federalist papers. as we all know, it was not the initial publication of 1788. [laughter] is 1857. the papers of alexander hamilton and john jay and james madison. they discussed ideas. >> she is always correct. ideashey were discussing
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about listening and persuading and if you have so eloquently shared with us tonight, you will continue to do that. we thank you for your leadership, ability to communicate, and be with people and we know we do continue to lead as we stand for the principles of the federalist papers were discussing that led to our constitution. thank you and congratulations. [applause] >> hang on. >> put mom -- [laughter] is no different from mine.
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>> great. [applause] >> ok, is anybody hungry? governor bush, thank you so much. and now you get to enjoy your meal. we have an exciting supplement after your meal. we are glad you're here with us. enjoy your meal. inefully the service can get the packed house. thank you for being here. >> a look at a recent article about the first mole hunt. as is part of the spotlight on magazine series. it's about 40 minutes.
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host: david wise is with me. he has written several books about intelligence gathering. you have a story in the recent position -- the recent addition of "smithsonian" magazine. "when the fbi spent decades hunting for a soviet spy on its staff." when did this happen, how did it come about? guest: it is the first mulholland. -- mole hunt. i broke that story. it was very secret. the fbi still will not talk about it. in 1962, a kgb agent in new york city walked into the fbi building in manhattan and volunteered his services. he said he was discontent and his talents were not being recognized.
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a familiar story. the fbi people said were to taking a big chance to walk into our building because you might have been seen? no doubt some of your people are looking into our building. he said, no, i am not worried about it. our people are meeting with your guy, dick. oh. that was telling the fbi that the russians had a mole inside the fbi and the russians called him dick. the fbi launched a mole hunt to try to find dick. because they did not know his real name, they called him an sub -- unsub, which stands for unknown subject. it turned the fbi upside down for a couple of decades.
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they are looking for this guy. host: the year that it all began? guest: 1962. host: was he ever caught? he or she? guest: that's an interesting story. it was a he, as far as is known. the russian was code-named fedora. as to whether or not he was a payments telling the truth or code name in the fbi. telling the truth or trying to upset the fbi -- the belief was there was a mole. there were about 500 people in
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the new york office they were looking at. anyone of them could have been the mole. was he caught? in the 1980's, an analyst for the fbi, robert king, began to get some information when kulack came back to new york for the second time. they began to hear. host: kulack being? guest: kulack being fedora. two things. bob king found out the man had retired. they found that he lived in queens, new york. the rents are lower than manhattan. the second piece of information and very important is they found out his name began with the letter "g." people began looking to see if
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they could find anyone who had retired whose name began with that letter. no match. when you translate something into surrealistic, the russian cyrillic, the rationale for the the russian alphabet and then retranslated, he found a match for somebody who had lived in queens and had been eased out because of a drinking problem. and other medical issues. it was believed he was the one. he denied it. he was visited several times by fbi agents and he denied it. one of these agents believed that denial and one did not. there were other interesting aspects in this because a man named kahlúa get in -- calougan
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wrote that he had sent some of his people to visit this man in queens because they hoped to get more information from him. according to calougan, he tells me the man said he gave everything he knew, don't bother me anymore. host: is he still alive? the unsub, dick? guest: i do not know. host: what do they say about your mole hunt? guest: even though i quote these people on the record, the fbi's official comment is we have no
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comment and we will not confirm there such a case. host: nor deny it? guest: they will not comment on it. whether or not it was such a case. they do not deny. host: you have been covering these agencies for years. what you make of their response? guest: they are sensitive about the fact that they were in a traded for the first time, or so they believe. i do not want to focus attention on it. it was more of a pr comment because you have these guys telling me about the case which is in the story. host: david wise, contributed to the most recent "smithsonian" magazine. about the first mole hunt within the fbi history. that is our spotlight this morning as we continue our series on the "washington journal."
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he is author of several intelligence books. "the inside story" and co-author of "the invisible government." and others. before we get to phone calls, we encourage our viewers to start dialing in now. talk about what happened when the fbi learned of a mole giving secrets to the russians at the time. what does it trigger? guest: it triggered a mole hunt. one interesting new ones is when mr. coulak came in and volunteered his services, one thing was certain and that was he was not talking to the mole. they were reassured about that. the fbi launched an intensive
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mole hunt that went on for decades. two people were put in charge of it. they were senior people who were very trusted and knew that they were not the mole. they began looking at the background of all of their people. one story that i love is that the man named jim nolan -- she was a young agent in new york looking for a place to live. -- he was a young agent in new york looking for a place to live. he wanted to make a phone call about an apartment. he went down to the garage where there was a pay phone. he goes down to the garage with another agent -- host: it was probably tapped. guest: you just killed my story. he starts to pick up any agent within says do not use this one.
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that one is tapped. he was thinking if that law must tapped, all of the other phones were tapped. host: that is what triggered the mole hunt for several decades? guest: it was the russian walking in and saying, you have a problem. host: let's go to charles, tampa, florida, republican caller. caller: there was a book written and sold in bookstores about robert hanssen, and i.t. specialists. guest: i wrote that book. it is called "spy." caller: this mole and story today is about the same man?
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guest: no, it was about the first mole hunt in the fbi. after that, there were at least three. there was a man named richard miller and a man named earl pitts. then there was robert hanssen, who was sentenced to life in prison. which is where he is right now. what i was writing about the very first mole, a man named dick. caller: is there any concern
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about the first mole that you wrote about? does this indicate there may be other people having secrets to the other agencies in the -- outside of the fbi? guest: they always have to suspect there might be some sort of internal problem. there is always a continuing concern. not so much anymore about the first mole hunt because that was so many years ago. it is a continuing concern. both agencies have important calendar -- counterintelligence functions. host: could it happen today? guest: it could happen today. the russians still have a spy agency. it is called the svr. they just change the initials from kgb to svr. they do some spying, but they are more internal.
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they have a setup like we do. it's a separate organization. it gets complicated. they have an external service like the cia and an internal service called the fsb. host: connecticut, democratic caller. caller: there is a book by timothy wiener called "enemies: a history of the fbi." it came out in 2012. they discussed the moles and things leading up to 9/11, the fbi was criminally negligent because of things that occurred in 2001. that is not what i wanted to talk about. i want to talk about the fact that the nsa surveillance has been going on further than the
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bush era. it is been going back to j edgar hoover when they eavesdrop on martin luther king, jr. and they blackmailed him. i was wondering if you could speak on that. thank you. guest: i do not know what your question is, exactly, but the nsa, which did not exist until 1952 -- the nsa has gone beyond what anyone realized. beyond the wiretapping of angela merkel personal cell phone. it's hard to believe a terrorist would call her up and say i am a terrorist, i thought you would i thought i would let you know that we are going to blow up a building.
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it does not sound very likely they should be doing that. that is my opinion. host: what do you make of the revelations overall of what the work that the nsa is doing? guest: the nsa is an important agency. it seems they have gone beyond what anyone suspected they could be doing. i do not think their collection of metadata is not over her, but logged. -- overheard but logged. that seems to be going beyond what is necessary. if they have a bad guy, they can put in for a warrant. they will get a warrant in almost every case to wiretap that person. they do not need to know that i was talking to my brother or my on -- or my aunt on the phone.
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i called that person. that is pretty suspicious. that seems -- if they suspect you or they suspect me, they can get a warrant and they can wiretap our phone. they do not need to wiretap every phone in the world. or america at the lease. it is mind-boggling to think about the amount of data that is. host: several comments were made by keith alexander and he made the case that what they do helps agencies like the fbi. i want to show you and get your response. [video clip] >> we are only part of the intelligence agency that does that. you have cia and fbi. the fbi is a tremendous partner in the homeland. they do great work. our job is to give them the information we see coming from overseas into the united states.
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nsa is a tremendous foreign intelligence capability to see things that are going on in the united states and help people understand what that means. the fbi is pretty busy. they have a lot of stuff going on. if you see something critical, we can tell he -- tell them that piece of information is critical, go after that first. that helps them. it helps us. guest: as i said, the idea that they're going to help the fbi by logging every phone call made by every american, which they did and do as far as i know, i do not see how that is helping the fbi. it is almost as though the nsa is saying we're art -- we are doing this because we can. not because it is necessary. host: brookfield, connecticut, independent caller. hi phil.
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caller: one of my favorite books was i chose freedom. i was wondering if you had ever run into the author or knew of his work? guest: i've heard of the book, but i have not met the gentleman. host: phil, do you have a follow-up? caller: no, it was just a fascinating tale of living in the united states, being pursued by the kgb. host: what about the history here between russia and the united states and spying on each other? why are you interested in it and what do you make from this report and the smithsonian magazine? caller: i love it. it shows you that the profession is never going to go away.
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the naivety of the media. pretending it does not happen. and nick stand up infiltration -- and the intent of the infiltration. it is still being denied. guest: the media does not pretend it never happened. witness my story in the current "smithsonian." host: we will move on. if you could speak a little bit about the history. the first mole hunt begins in 1962. what is happening at this time in our history between russia and the united states question mark -- russia and the united states? how prevalent is it of russia spying on the united states and vice versa? guest: the cold war was fought
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largely by intelligence agencies. it was out of sight. that was principally the war between the cia --. and the russian first chief director. they are not located in the famous square in downtown moscow. they are located on the ring road. i was the first western reporter allowed in. i spent an evening interviewing a general there. it was interesting. when i asked him about the future of the soviet union and russia, it was just before the collapse of the soviet union. he predicted a lot of trouble between the rub public's -- the republics in the south.
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he was absolutely right. the war in chechnya came afterwards. he spoke perfect english although he had never lived in this country or an english- speaking country. that was impressive. the war between the agencies went on in washington, moscow, it was difficult for the american cia people in moscow to meet people. the russian kgb people were effective in surveilling the embassy were most of them were stationed. if a cia person stepped foot outside the embassy, six kgb guys following them. sometimes they used burst transmitters -- very fast transmitters. other cases, old-fashioned spying modes, making a mark on a lamp post or going to a dead
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drop -- a hiding place to pick up documents. sometimes they turn away the russian volunteers who had good information, but thought maybe they were dangles and they were really fakes. good people were turned away for several occasions. the cia managed to recruit effective people. 10 of them were executed as a result when their identities were betrayed. others went to prison. their betrayer was offered money by the kgb for information. it was an active spy work. host: does it continue today? guest: it does continue. the initials have changed, but not the war.
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host: what about the tactics? you were just talking about. guest: tactics have changed somewhat. they still use old-fashioned methods. they are also using computer technology in ways that they can hide messages in what look like and enough -- an innocuous picture. some of that technology was used by those arrested by the fbi in 2010. these were people posing as americans who have been specially trained to do that. some of them lived ordinary lives in new jersey or other places, and for all the world and their neighbors knew, they were ordinary americans, but they were russian spies. host: the stories we heard and read about, what are some of the names from 2010? guest: one of the most famous names was anna chapman.
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she got a medal from vladimir putin and became the russian equivalent of playboy or penthouse. she has her own tv show now. she was posing as a real estate agent and living in new york. nobody knew she was a russian spy. host: robert, west virginia, republican caller. go ahead. caller: i would like to ask if he has any knowledge of us possibly training russian troops in the carolinas on marine bases? guest: no, i do not.
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host: why do you ask? caller: i ask for security reasons. why will be be training russian troops -- why would we be training russian troops? we have no reason to train russian troops in our states. guest: i have no knowledge of that. host: will, independent caller. caller: good to see you. appreciate all that c-span is doing for us. we want to ask our guest some very important questions and hope we get good, honest remarks from him. he is going back to 1962, right before kennedy was assassinated. are you familiar with the word whistleblower? he has so much knowledge about all of the surveillance
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intelligence and all of this, he should have a lot to talk about about history. i wish you could tell us why -- you can go on youtube and you have more disclosure, more accountability, and a lot more knowledge in any of the public outcries, radio, whatever. what i would like to ask -- do you think there was a conspiracy with john f. kennedy and the corruption between j edgar hoover and a cia cabinet member going on at the same time. president kennedy was trying to break down the secret organization and all the secrecy going on in the background.